408 Cleveland.

Trickflow 225cc Heads 10.3:1

245/245 @ .050 .612 110L/S

Trickflow Open Plenum Manifold

On The Dyno
408ci Cleveland
RPM: TQ: HP:
3,600 499 342
3,800 496 359
4,000 496 378
4,200 499 399
4,400 508 426
4,600 516 452
4,800 519 474
5,000 520 495
5,200 522 517
5,400 523 538
5,600 522 557
5,800 521 575
6,000 517 591
6,200 514 607
6,400 510 621

HRM

COST JUST OVER $11,000

$700 AUSSIE FORD 351C BLOCK

$250 MAIN BEARING SUPPORT GIRDLE

$600 BLASTED CRACK TEST, BORE TORQUE PLATE HONE, SURFACE DECK, WASHED 

$40 CAM BEARINGS & BRASS FREEZE PLUGS

(1590)


$750 SCAT 4340 FORGED CRANKSHAFT ($325 CAST STEEL CRANK)

$425 SCAT 6.00' H-BEAM RODS ($325 SCAT I-BEAM RODS)

$600 AUTO-TECH PISTONS

$120 PLASMA-MOLY / NAPIER RINGS

$70 KING MAIN BEARINGS

$20 REAR MAIN

$70 KING ROD BEARINGS

$125 HARMONIC BALANCER

$25 BALANCER BOLT

$80 FLEXPLATE

$10 FLEXPLATE BOLTS

$180 BALANCED

(2475)


$2000 TRICKFLOW 195CC HEADS

$80 HEAD GASKETS

$100 HEAD BOLTS

$170 VALVE COVERS

$10 PCV

$25 COVER BREATHER

(2385)


$300 HYDRAULIC ROLLER CAM 237/237 L/S 110

$180 HYDRAULIC ROLLER LIFTERS

$60 LIFTER RETENTION KIT

$30 CAM SHAFT THRUST PLATE

$110 CHROME-MOLY PUSHRODS

$350 CHROME-MOLY ROLLER ROCKERS

$50 TRUE ROLLER CHAIN ROLLER TIMING SET

$25 PUMP ECCENTRIC

$100 TIMING COVER

(1205)


$50 ENGINE BOLTS

$125 OIL PAN

$20 PAN GASKET

$25 PICKUP

$10 DIPSTICK

$50 OIL PUMP STD VOLUME HIGH PRESSURE

$20 OIL PUMP DRIVESHAFT

$20 OIL FILTER MOROSO

(320)


$335 EDELBROCK RPM INTAKE MANIFOLD

$20 INTAKE GASKET

$220 FUEL PUMP McRobb

$80 FUEL LINES AND FITTINGS

$70 AIR CLEANER

$550 SS-850 - Quick Fuel SS-Series Carburetors Choke:Electric Secondary Type:Mechanical CFM:850

$210 READY TO RUN DISTRIBUTOR

$40 COIL

$65 FORD RACING PLUG WIRE SET

$10 WIRE SEPARATORS

$20 NGK SPARK PLUGS BKR6E


$950 ASSEMBLE ENGINE

$750 DYNO TEST ENGINE

 $115 WATER PUMP

$10 THERMOSTAT

$15 THERMOSTAT HOUSING

$130 ALTERNATOR BRACKET

$110 ALTERNATOR

The duel plane manifold didn't care for a spacerplate.

Peak Hp was 575 with 573 without at 5800RPM.

Ideal.

I target most engines to make peak Hp at between 5500 to 6000RPM.

Drag racing will benefit from peaking a little higher, but under 450CID you don't want to give up torque below 3000RPM, you need it for first gear.

The motor made 448lbs/ft @ 2100rpm, climb to 500 by 2800rpm and peaked at 4600rpm with 581.7lbs/ft, not too shabby.

If you look at the rate of decline of the torque curve I would suggest the duel plane manifold had reach it's airflow limitation.

If I were to switch to a signal plane manifold, I'd add at least 6 degrees more duration.

Finally all finish ready for dyno testing.

In addition to brass freeze plugs I like to use brass NPT plugs everywhere.


I don't know why they don't machine the hole in the valve covers, you have to have them.

I used a die grinder to open the hole to 1.250", installed the grommets, one for the PCV the other for a breather,.

I also installed the oil deflector baffles.

Here the main clearance was measured to be .0025" as was the rod clearance when using -.001" undersize bearings from King

Here is a 408 Cleveland I built for and I show it here as an example

Here I check the height of the Autotec pistons. I have it .002" above the deck

The top ring gap was set at .020" Piston clearance was .0035

This motor got a Howards camshaft.

I had to scrape the number one bearing just a tad to get it to turn nice.

Attach the degree wheel, find TDC and install two lifters. See the video of me doing it. I did speak very loud, so you may need to turn up the volume

Here is what I measured. Real close to the published figures.

After coming back from the machine shop I wash the block again and painted it with Gylptol on the inside and VHT Cleveland blue on the outside

Close fit, just enough room for the power brake vacuum fitting.

How about at the back of the motor with the coil.

Huge 1000Hp McRobb Fuel pump

To find pushrod length I drop in a pushrod length checker and then just sit a rocker on it end the valve.

By using a marker pen then swing the rocker tip sideways I can see where the tip sits on the valve.

By shortening the checker to form the line .050 off center toward the intake side, I find my length.

In this case the intake was 7.900", but the exhaust needed 8.000"

Because these aftermarket stroker cranks with Cleveland main journals are also used in aftermarket Windsor block having a Cleveland main size, the timing set requires a spacer to make it work.

Both this crank and spacer are from Scat.

Measuring the port entry I determined there was a definitely tight port through the pushrod pinch.

As these were 195cc head and they can be cut to 225cc, I felt that this area could be open up a little without risk of hurting flow or velocity, so I carefully open up the size of the port entry.

I use a 60 grit to produce a course finish to encourage atomization.

There is an old saying in this business, right up there with "there is no replacement for displacement" and "the only replacement for cubic inches is cubic feet".

And that is "if a lot is good, too much is just right".

To that end I cut a 30 degree angle under the 45 degree seat angle which you see here with the lapped finish, but on the intake I cut a third 15 degree angle.

Then on top of the valve I cut a 7 degree angle and chamfered the sharp edge.

The idea is that as the intake or exhaust first open, the gas will flow a little less restricted over the opposite valve.

But honestly, I doubt it will make any real difference to power output.


Turning the short block rightside up you can see the Ford Racing high RPM hydraulic lifters held in place by the Comp Cams retention harware

I either use grade 8 bolts if I'm going to paint them or stainless steel if it is holding aluminum in place

Before installing the oil pump I put a washer behind the pressure relief spring to bump the pressure a tad higher.

Every Cleveland I build is unique, but this combination is pretty ideal.

I have don't it with a cast crank to reduce cost as the crank is strong enough under power made upto 6500RPM.


I have more Cleveland related info on this page. CLICK HERE

This is a combination built and test by another shop.

Note that the short duration, smaller port and duel plan manifold produce a little more torque (17lbs, but it is not an accurate comparison) and made the same at 5800RPM.

Over 6000RPM the large size will begin to shine.

However compare peak torque numbers, 583 verse 523.

583 :- 408 = 1.428

523 :- 408 = 1.281

Which motor do you think will be faster on the street?

Don't get hung up chasing horsepower.

Here we see the main bearing support girdle installed.

Then finally all the pistons in.

I used a torque wrench to turn the crank and measured 25lbs/ft of drag.

Heavy duty pump driveshaft.

Install the pick before installing the pump.

And a quick check of the dipstick depth.

We are going to need a regulator with a pump that big, but where to put it?

The insides of the all aluminum water pump


Because the valve covers required two 4" long bolts, I used studs with acorn nuts to make it look nice


I apply silicone to the ends of the block for the manifold.

I let it skin for about 30 minutes, then drop the manifold on it, but only tighten the bolts finger tight.

After about 24 hours I torque the manifold down to squeeze the silicone tight. I want to a void leaks, but also make it possible to remove the manifold without tearing the gasket and making a mess.

I used bolts as long as possible.

All my bolts are either stainless steel or grade 8


The ports were close enough that port matching was not required

I installed the springs at 2.015" having 150lbs on the seats.

The valves are stainless steel, the seals Viton and the retainer's titanium.

Should be steady to 7000RPM

Ask any professional head porter and he'll tell you unless you have a flow bench you can do more harm than good.

With this in mind I try to stick with blend the CNC cuts and the transition to the seat

Before putting on the Trickflow 195cc CNC ported heads I wanted to better blend in the bowl area to the valve seat